Monthly Archives: May 2015

Fear and Safety at Penn: A Collaborative Student Research Exhibit

Check out Penn WIC’s new blog post about Dr. Rosemary Frasso’s Qualitative Methods graduate course for Social work and Public Health Students!


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Dr. Rosemary Frasso, Allison Golinkoff (TA) and graduate student research team – Qualitative Research Methods for Social Work (SW 781)

Research seldom happens in silos.  Be it through the literature review, data collection, or publication, group collaboration is the ingredient that brings new ideas and perspectives to the research process.  It is with this spirit that Dr. Rosemary Frasso (Rosie), Allison Golinkoff (TA), and the student researchers of the Qualitative Methods graduate course for Social Work and Public Health students took teamwork to new heights this spring in theVan Pelt Collaborative Classroom.

From the start, the student researchers employed qualitative methods (Nominal Group Technique) to collectively determine the research topic of “fear and safety” at Penn. Next, each individual student-researcher conducted 5 intercept Freelisting interviews across campus to explore the topic. Using the full 360 degrees of writable whiteboard surfaces in the Collaborative Classroom, students began the process of analyzing Freelisting data to identify salient themes.

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Student researchers begin organizing Freelisting data in the Van Pelt Collaborative Classroom

Inspired by the work of Drs. Carolyn Cannuscio,Mariana Chilton, and Gala True, Rosie designed this class project employing Photo Elicitation interviewing.  Students later made use of this same technique to further explore the meaning of fear and safety across the Penn community.  As a team, the class selected a sampling strategy and each student-researcher was tasked with recruiting a participant from within the Penn community to explore how she/he perceives fear and safety.  Over the course of one week, research participants used their smartphones or cameras to take photographs of any aspects of their daily lives that made them think of fear or safety.  The photos were then used to guide an interview between the researcher and the participant about those topics.

Dr. Frasso turned to group collaboration in the Collaborative Classroom as a strategy to help the student researchers make sense of the sizable amount of data they all collected.    Through collaborative analysis, student researchers found that their participants’ views on fear and safety revolved around eight thematic categories: vulnerability; sense of belonging; fear of failure; surveillance; physical and mental health; fear of the unknown; sources of comfort; and spaces and places.

The student researchers of Dr. Frasso’s class see their research findings as a potential catalyst for change at Penn.  To this end, they have made their work visible in many ways.  You can view their research exhibit, complete with photos and participant quotes, just outside the Van Pelt Collaborative Classroom (right before the WIC entrance, to the right).  Students also plan to share their findings with key members of the Penn community such as President Amy Gutmann, CAPS, and GAPSA.

For more information on displaying your students’ work or using Van Pelt’s Collaborative Classroom for enhanced teamwork and engagement, visit: http://www.library.upenn.edu/facilities/collab.html.

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Written by: Catrice Barrett

Arrest on the Run: How a Penn MPH Student Saved a Life Using CPR

On Sunday, May 3, 2015, Kelsey Sheak, a 2015 Master of Public Health Candidate at the University of Pennsylvania, woke up and prepared to run the 10K Broad Street Run.  Shortly after starting the race, she noticed a crowd gathering around a collapsed man. Upon arriving at his side, Kelsey immediately put her CPR training into action.  Kelsey was one of the many bystanders who helped this fallen runner survive from his cardiac arrest.  Read her full story below.


 

Kelsey Sheak, 2015 MPH Candidate

Kelsey Sheak, 2015 MPH Candidate

CPHI: We heard you performed a life-saving procedure at the Broad Street Run on Sunday, May 3, 2015.

Kelsey Sheak: I did!  I was running and between miles 2 and 3 I saw a crowd of people. There was a gentleman in the center of the crowd and he was clearly having a medical emergency.  Shortly after I arrived, he lost his pulse.  Once he lost his pulse, a group of bystanders and I started administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).  We communally performed CPR – one person would start, another person would step in, and so on.  After about ten minutes in, the Philadelphia Police Department came with an automated external defibrillator (AED). The police are trained on how to use AEDs and to provide emergency medical care. They took over for all the bystanders and the patient was shocked and taken to the hospital.  We were sent on our way and told to continue running. It was a little weird!

CPHI: Let’s back up for a minute. You are a Master of Public Health (MPH) student, but clearly you are well trained in CPR. What is your background?

KS: It’s crazy because 40,000 people ran the Broad Street Run and for me to come upon this is just mind-blowing – really serendipitous.  My background is in cardiac arrest research and education.  By profession I spend my days learning as much as I can about CPR and ways to improve it, ways to disseminate it, and ways to make survival much better.  To come across this situation where I needed to use it was crazy.

CPHI: Who were other bystanders?

KS: Most of the people that were helping the collapsed runner had medical backgrounds: nurses, a physician, and me.  The most important take-home message is that he didn’t need a medical professional; he just needed someone to recognize that he was in cardiac arrest and that he needed CPR.  Anyone who is trained can do that.  If you’re not trained in CPR, you should be!

CPHI: How was it meeting the collapsed runner the next day in the hospital?

KS: I went to the hospital after he arrested and I was able to meet his family.  They were very nice and very thankful.  I’m happy to know that he will go back to having a normal life.

CPHI: I want to take a moment to address a common misconception: many people think a heart attack is the same as a cardiac arrest. Can you help clear up this confusion?

KS: A cardiac arrest is when your heart stops and blood flow stops to the entire body.  With a heart attack, your heart doesn’t stop; rather, there is a blockage. Generally, people who have a heart attack have chest pain, they go to the hospital, and they can recover.  Cardiac arrest generally happens with little to no warning and people are generally healthy when it happens.  It can happen for a lot of different reasons and everyone’s reason is different.

CPHI: Is there a most common reason why cardiac arrest happens?

KS: There isn’t a most common reason – but there are situations that are most savable.  The gentleman at the race had a savable arrest because he had a shockable arrest.  This means that his heart was in a rhythm that a defibrillator could recognize and turn into a healthy heart rhythm.  Places like airports, casinos, and races are places where lots of cardiac arrest victims do well – there are numerous educated people around and these places are heavily watched. But there are also places where people don’t do well – like low-income neighborhoods, which are less likely to receive bystander CPR.

CPHI: After you helped save a fellow racer, did you continue running?

KS: Yes, I finished the race!


 

For more information about CPR and cardiac arrest, please visit the Penn Medicine Center for Resuscitation Science website.

Event Recap: The State of the State: Opioid Use and Misuse in Philadelphia

It was a pleasure to hear two inspirational people – Dr. Brian Work (MD, MPH) and Ms. Samantha Gross (JD, MPH) – talk about their paths to and work in community health at the Service Link, MedX, and Wharton Undergraduate Healthcare Club (WUHC) speaker event on Friday, April 10, 2015. My reflection can best be captured by the following lessons in career paths and working with community health.

Brian Work & Samantha Gross

Brian Work & Samantha Gross

On your journey to community health, remember:

  • Take advantage of serendipity
  • Nothing is irrevocable
  • Appreciate conversations / advice from people (even if unsolicited)
  • Participate in community work now! It’s called “practicing” medicine for a reason – it needs to become a habit. Life will already be full if you don’t prioritize community work now.

Community work embodies how medicine can improve with an interdisciplinary approach:

  • Community work makes Brian a better hospitalist
  • Community allows for engagement with a more diverse setting with more collaboration (e.g., medical-legal partnerships) instead of becoming too focused on a comfortable setting and subsequently isolated
  • Both medical treatments and legal policies are about harm reduction!

speaker event aprilAll of these insights and more were facilitated by our smooth moderator – Matthew Kearney – and packaged through Brian’s exuberant charm and Sam’s calm confidence. Look out for more at Service Link’s next speaker event (once per semester).

 

Written by: Neel Koyawala, Class of 2015 College of Arts and Sciences and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania undergraduate student