Monthly Archives: March 2015

Health Equity- A Dream or an Achievable Goal?

Source: Saskatoon Health Region Advancing Health Equity

Source: Saskatoon Health Region Advancing Health Equity

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.”  – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Nearly half a century after Dr. King’s observation, the Affordable Care Act made tremendous strides towards equality of access in health care. Equality promotes fairness, however it’s only effective if everyone starts from the same place and has the same needs.  When it comes to breaking the barriers to health care equity—we still have a long road.

Dr. David Satcher was the keynote speaker for the Perelman School of Medicine Health Equity Symposium, held at the University of Pennsylvania in January. He was the first African American Surgeon General of the United States and is the current director of The Satcher Leadership Institute at the Morehouse School of Medicine. “In order to eliminate disparities we need leaders who care enough, know enough, will do enough, and are persistent enough,” he said. He encouraged attendees to delve deeper into the realities of health inequity in America.  The symposium provided a glimpse into some of these inequities.

According to the CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities 2013 Report, Non-Hispanic Black adults are 50% more likely to die of heart disease or stroke prematurely than Caucasians.  Until recently, scant efforts in organizational quality improvement were made in health care to address racial disparities. This was evident in the health care inequities of our Veterans population.

Said Ibrahim, co-director of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Center of Health Equity Research, posed the following question at the Symposium,

“How do we make sure the equality of opportunity translates to the equality of health outcomes?”

According to the Department of Veteran Affairs Health Service Research & Development Services, minority veterans are receiving less and lower quality health care, despite needing more and higher quality care (suggesting a form of “regressive” healthcare delivery).

Another population that is currently experiencing health care inequities are Asian Americans. They are currently the fastest growing minority group with a growth rate increase of 46% from 2000 to 2010.  Ironically, this group receives little attention in the statistical analyses of health and health care inequities. The labeling of the “model minority” for Asian Americans is quite paradoxical —simultaneously successful and marginal. The notion has often led to the tuning out of the hardships of prejudices, health disparities, and health care inequities, Asian Americans face.

pic 2

Although the Affordable Care Act benefited Asian Americans in increasing health care access, cultural competence and community engagement is necessary to successfully eliminate the gaps in health care equity.   A concerted effort by public health professionals on local, state, and national levels will help bridge the gap in health care access in the Asian American & Pacific Islander communities.

The LGBT community  faces health care inequity as well. Risk of psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, and suicide are elevated as a result of social stigma and discrimination, calling for a need for culturally competent medical care.

SOURCE: Center for American Progress, 2009

SOURCE: Center for American Progress, 2009

Increasing coverage promotes greater access to care but it won’t translate to equity of health outcomes. Quality improvements in health care delivery must place emphasis on social determinants of health and culturally competent care.  Our health care approach should not be one size fits all, but rather it must be modified to fit the specific needs of vulnerable populations.

Written by: Amy Rajan, RN, MSN/MPH Candidate, Class of 2016