Penn’s Dominating MPH Presence at APHA’s 142nd Annual Meeting & Expo

The University of Pennsylvania’s Master of Public Health Program made a strong showing at this year’s APHA meeting in New Orleans. This year’s conference theme was “Healthography: How Where You Live Affects Your Health and Well-Being.” Six alumni, four current students, and many faculty presented their work. The Penn MPH booth at the Public Health Expo was also very popular!APHA_2014_Annual_Meeting


Alumni:

Noel Harbist, MD, MPH

Primary care pediatricians identify barriers to recommended care

With the establishment of the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) Pediatric Quality Measures Program (PQMP), there is increased attention to the measurement and delivery of recommended care. Primary care pediatricians identify time, payment issues, and family issues to be significant barriers to delivery of recommended care.  Enhancements in QI processes, such as the design of electronic medical records, may improve the documentation of care, but may not alleviate the obstacles pediatricians identified in the delivery of recommended care. QI strategies for delivery of recommended care should consider pediatricians’ perspectives and the possible role public health initiatives.

Jordan Price, MPH

Barriers and facilitators influencing inconsistent condom use in young adults in Philadelphia

Rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea in Philadelphia are three to four times higher the national rates, respectively, and clients served by Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania (PPSP) have the highest rates in the city. Though it is well known that condoms are one of the most effective ways to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs), reasons behind inconsistent condom use are not fully understood. This study aims to identify the barriers and facilitators that influence

Jane Seymour, MPH

Literacy and fertility: Lifecourse evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY)

Literacy is associated with many health outcomes among US adults, but little is known about its relationship with reproductive outcomes. This study assessed the link between literacy and fertility outcomes for US women.

Elizabeth Stelson, LSW, MSW, MPH

Reentry and reunification: Investigating the influence of children in the reentry experience of mothers released from short-term jail stay

The incarceration rate of women has increased 800% in the last 30 years, and 80% of incarcerated women are mothers of children (<18 years of age). Research on community reentry for mothers released from prison has shed light on how social determinates of health—such as social support, housing, and employment—relate to successful reunification with children. Successful prison reentry has been linked to improved health and social outcomes for both the mother and child. However, little is known about maternal reentry following release from jail, which is markedly different from prison, characterized by a shorter stay, uncertainty awaiting sentence, and access to fewer resources.

Resources for reentry: Investigating the biopsychosocial needs of mothers of young children released from jail

The vast majority of incarcerated women (80%) are mothers of children (<18 years). Research on community reentry for mothers released from prison has identified significant barriers to health care services (HCS) and unmet social health needs. However, little is known about the reentry barriers experienced by mothers released from jail, characterized by shorter stays and fewer HCS compared to prison.

Samantha Gross, JD, MPH

Medical legal partnership education: A survey of existing programs and recommendations for national curriculum

Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP) is an integrative and collaborative model that brings legal services directly into the health care setting to assist patients in maximizing health and social benefits.  Legal remedies can resolve many socioeconomic and environmental issues common to vulnerable and underserved populations.  Also MLPs vary in structure, three components are central to the model: (1) providing direct legal assistance, (2) transforming health and legal institutions, and (3) achieving policy-level change.  These partnerships are uniquely suited to address necessary social and legal needs in an accessible clinical setting. This research addresses the current MLP educational environment by conducting interviews with MLP educators throughout the country to better understand how health care and law students are prepared to work in this unique, collaborative setting and the current challenges to providing MLP education.

Kaitlyn Meirs, MPH

Investigatory research on the distribution and accessibility of physicians with environmental expertise in the Gulf of Mexico

Disparate access to health care has been well documented, however, little is known about access to providers trained in assessment of environmental exposure and related care. Industries depend on occupational clinics that employ physicians with environmental expertise to provide exposure care to industry employees. Physicians employed in this setting are generally unavailable to see patients other than those employed by contracted companies due to potential conflict of interest. Our project evolved from concerns related to a lack of access to physicians with environmental expertise in the Gulf of Mexico and is supported through the Community Outreach and Engagement Core (COEC) of the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (CEET) supported by NIEHS (P30ES013508).

Current students:

Natalie Stollon, MSW, MPH(c)

Transitioning from pediatric to adult services: A public health approach

Due to advances in neonatal and pediatric care, patients with chronic illnesses and disabilities are surviving well into adult life and are faced with needing to navigate the challenging transition to adult care. As with all medical transitions, there is valid concern that patient morbidity and mortality are adversely affected during this time. We carried out a pilot Primary Care Transition Program, a randomized controlled trial that evaluated whether participation in three different transition interventions increased transition readiness, successful transition to an adult care provider and patient, caregiver and provider satisfaction and systematically evaluated and implemented transition plans for CHOP patients and families as they transitioned from pediatric to adult care. At this point the RCT is ongoing. 6-month and 10-month post-intervention surveys are being collected. We have 33 young adults and 10 caregivers enrolled in the study. Analysis will be complete by May 2014.

Caren Steinway, MSW(c), MPH(c)

Transitioning from pediatric to adult services: A public health approach

Due to advances in neonatal and pediatric care, patients with chronic illnesses and disabilities are surviving well into adult life and are faced with needing to navigate the challenging transition to adult care. As with all medical transitions, there is valid concern that patient morbidity and mortality are adversely affected during this time. We carried out a pilot Primary Care Transition Program, a randomized controlled trial that evaluated whether participation in three different transition interventions increased transition readiness, successful transition to an adult care provider and patient, caregiver and provider satisfaction and systematically evaluated and implemented transition plans for CHOP patients and families as they transitioned from pediatric to adult care. At this point the RCT is ongoing. 6-month and 10-month post-intervention surveys are being collected. We have 33 young adults and 10 caregivers enrolled in the study. Analysis will be complete by May 2014.

Bridget Keogh, BS

Building a trauma-informed care peer workforce

This session provides a description of the implementation of a statewide, four year trauma-informed mental health (MH) and co-occurring disorders (COD) care systems change initiative. The goals of the systems change are to: 1) prepare outpatient mental health and co-occurring system providers and specialists to build a system of care based on a consumer-defined set of principles and values that integrate lived trauma experiences into MH and COD recovery services; 2) provide universal trauma screening and assessment to all individuals who enter the recovery system; and 3) to build a workforce of trauma peer specialists to provide trauma-informed recovery services across the service and provider network. The primary focus of this initiative is to change the culture of the treatment delivery system; incorporating a trauma-informed recovery philosophy and activities into all recovery services. This session will provide a description of the process of implementing universal screening and assessment and an analysis of the data of over 2,000 individuals who were screened for trauma experience at the onset of entering the recovery system over a three year period and on the design, implementation, and outcomes of trauma peer-delivered recovery services.

Ebony Easley

Psychosocial implications of uncertainty in genomic testing of children with autism

Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA) is a genome-wide technology that enables identification of genomic alterations, many of which are of uncertain clinical significance. Clinical guidelines recommend CMA testing for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which occurs in approximately 1% of the US population. Increasingly, families are offered CMA testing, and many receive complex and uncertain results.  In this study we examined the psychosocial implications for parents of children with ASD who received uncertain results from CMA testing. We collected data using in-depth interviews and self-report questionnaires. We used purposive sampling to recruit 57 parents, including three subgroups with positive, negative and uncertain results. This presentation focuses on the uncertain subgroup (n=20).

Written by: Allison Golinkoff, MPH Candidate 2016

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